Sarah Abramowicz

Sarah Abramowicz

Associate Professor of Law

Contact

Room 3234
(313) 577-3986

Sarah Abramowicz

  • Biography

    Sarah Abramowicz is an associate professor of law at Wayne State University Law School. She has taught courses on family law, contracts, and law and literature. Her scholarship focuses on the history of child custody law and of adoption, and on the place of childhood in the troubled intersection between family law and other areas of law, especially contract law. Her work has appeared in the Fordham Law Review, Yale Journal of Law & the Humanities and University of Colorado Law Review and has been selected for the Harvard/Stanford/Yale Junior Faculty Forum and for the Columbia/Georgetown/UCLA/USC Law & Humanities Junior Scholars Workshop.

    Abramowicz holds a doctorate in English literature from Columbia University. She earned her law degree from Columbia Law School, where she was Review & Essays Editor of the Columbia Law Review and a Kent Scholar. After earning her law degree, she was awarded a fellowship in the Program on Careers in Law Teaching at Columbia Law School. She then served as a law clerk to the Hon. Amalya L. Kearse of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

  • Degrees and Certifications

    Ph.D., Columbia University
    J.D., Columbia Law School
    B.A., Stanford University

  • Courses Taught

    Family Law, Contracts, Adoption in Law and Literature

  • Selected Publications

    Nature, Nurture, Narrative, Law: Oliver Twist, the Wellesley Case, and the Victorian Anxiety About Parentage (forthcoming, Nineteenth-Century Literature); selected for 2013 Law & Humanities Junior Scholars Workshop.

    Contractualizing Custody, 83 Fordham L. Rev. 67 (2014).

    Beyond Family Law, 63 Case W. Res. L. Rev. 293 (2012).

    A Family Law Perspective on Parental Incarceration
    , 50 Fam. Ct. Rev. 228 (2012).

    The Legal Regulation of Gay and Lesbian Families as Interstate Immigration Law, 65 Vand. L. Rev. En Banc 11 (2012).

    Rethinking Parental Incarceration, 82 U. Colo. L. Rev. 793 (2011).

    Childhood and the Limits of Contract, 21 Yale J.L. & Human. 37 (2009).

    Note, English Child Custody Law, 1660-1839: The Origins of Judicial Intervention in Paternal Custody, 99 Colum. L. Rev. 1344 (1999).

  • Social Science Research Network
    View SSRN Profile

    Publications

    • REVISION: Bifurcating Settlements
      July 16, 2019
      In settling a lawsuit, parties agree on their obligations to one another, but they need not separately address each issue, claim, or remedy that a trial court would have confronted. The legal system, however, can bifurcate the settlement process, requiring separate resolution of components of a settlement. Bi-furcation can protect third parties, for example, by preventing divorcing parents from trading child custody for money. In addition to identifying a wide range of contexts in which preventing trade-offs may be desirable, this Article shows that bifurcation will generally have only modest (and sometimes beneficial) effects on settlement rates.
    • REVISION: Bifurcating Settlements
      April 6, 2019
      In settling a lawsuit, parties agree on their obligations to one another, but they need not separately address each issue, claim, or remedy that a trial court would have confronted. The legal system, however, can bifurcate the settlement process, requiring separate resolution of components of a settlement. Bi-furcation can protect third parties, for example, by preventing divorcing parents from trading child custody for money. In addition to identifying a wide range of contexts in which preventing trade-offs may be desirable, this Article shows that bifurcation will generally have only modest (and sometimes beneficial) effects on settlement rates.

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