Anne Choike

Anne Choike

Assistant Professor (Clinical); Director of the Business and Community Law Clinic

Contact

Room 1229
(313) 577-9488

Anne Choike

  • Biography

    Professor Anne Choike’s scholarly interests focus on how community development is affected by the regulation of business and nonprofit entities and the regulation of business lawyers. She is the director of the Business and Community Law Clinic and an assistant professor (clinical), and teaches the clinic and advanced clinic at Wayne State University Law School. Choike’s work has been published in the Columbia Journal of Tax Law, and she has presented her research at Stanford Law’s Legal Design Lab, Columbia University’s Studio-X in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; at the I0e Biennale Internationale Design in Saint-Étienne, France; at the New York University Clinical Law Review Writer's Workshop; the American Association of Law Schools Annual Conference; the American Association of Law Schools Annual Conference on Clinical Legal Education; the Journal of Rural Sociology; and at other academic forums.

    Before joining Wayne Law, Choike taught at the University of Michigan Community and Economic Development Clinic as a clinical fellow and at the University of Michigan Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning as a course instructor in its Michigan-Mellon Project on Egalitarianism in the Metropolis. Through the Michigan-Mellon Project, she collaborated with University of Michigan architecture faculty to develop and teach an international, interdisciplinary experimental travel research studio in Detroit, Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo.

    Prior to entering academia, Choike was an attorney at Jenner & Block LLP and Stroock & Stroock & Lavan LLP. Her clinical law experience also includes practicing with the University of Michigan Low Income Taxpayer Clinic during law and graduate school. Prior to law school, Choike worked at General Motors. She also was an extern for Hon. Amy St. Eve at the U.S. District Court of the Northern District of Illinois.

    Choike earned her J.D. from Michigan Law and her M.U.P. from the University of Michigan Taubman School of Architecture and Urban Planning. She earned her B.A. from Cornell University College of Arts and Sciences, where she was a Rawlings Presidential Research Scholar and a Woods Fellow. She also studied and researched at Uniwersytet Jagielloński in Kraków, Poland, as a Tomaszkiewicz-Florio Scholar.
     

  • Degrees and Certifications

    B.A., Cornell University
    M.U.P., University of Michigan
    J.D., University of Michigan Law School

  • Social Science Research Network
    View SSRN Profile

    Publications

    • New: Entrepreneurship and the Built Environment
      October 1, 2016
      This Article will explore the relationship between entrepreneurship and the built environment by examining a significant obstacle to transportation network startups' expansion: outdated land use regulations that require significant parking requirements that decrease urban density and, in turn, consumer demand for such startup's services. Some of the resistance likely originates from landowners who, for example, anticipate their holdings will decrease in property value due to higher density and traffic. To these interest groups, reforming land use laws in this way represents a significant wealth transfer to transportation network startups. This Article proposes that one way transportation network startups might earn the support of these landowners – and, in turn, the city councils and zoning boards that represent their interests – could be to recognize reform of the laws and regulations governing the built environment as a capital raising strategy. In exchange, landowners and cities ...
    • REVISION: Examining Gallery-Supported Art Exhibitions
      August 12, 2016
      For-profit art galleries are making news for the donations they provide to nonprofit art organizations to support exhibitions of artists represented by such galleries. Yet nonprofit art organizations are committed to advancing art for the public interest, not for private profit. This Article examines whether there are any meaningful limits on gallery donations that support art exhibitions at nonprofit arts organizations, focusing on the legal framework governing federal tax-exempt status, as well as the self-regulatory rules and informal norms of the art industry. Does the existing regime allow gallery-supported art exhibitions or are they activities that do not further nonprofit art organizations’ missions? What short-term and long-term solutions are available and appropriate in light of the causes and context of gallery-supported art exhibitions? These questions are animated by the broader dialogue about equitable access to publicly funded resources, with the answers having ...
    • New: What Faculty Offices Can Teach
      August 12, 2016
      “Good rooms enable good teaching.” T. Vaughan (1991) Discussions about how physical environments impact student learning often center on the layout and placement of classrooms. In the law clinic context, these discussions also focus on the design of clinic office spaces. Much less attention has been paid to how clinical faculty members can (and do) use their own offices to create physical spaces that advance clinical learning goals and pedagogy. This poster presentation shows how clinical faculty members are turning their faculty offices into collaborative and motivational learning spaces by paying attention to the design and decoration of their offices.
    • REVISION: Examining Gallery-Supported Art Exhibitions
      August 11, 2016
      For-profit art galleries are making news for the donations they provide to nonprofit art organizations to support exhibitions of artists represented by such galleries. Yet nonprofit art organizations are committed to advancing art for the public interest, not for private profit. This Article examines whether there are any meaningful limits on gallery donations that support art exhibitions at nonprofit arts organizations, focusing on the legal framework governing federal tax-exempt status, as well as the self-regulatory rules and informal norms of the art industry. Does the existing regime allow gallery-supported art exhibitions or are they activities that do not further nonprofit art organizations’ missions? What short-term and long-term solutions are available and appropriate in light of the causes and context of gallery-supported art exhibitions? These questions are animated by the broader dialogue about equitable access to publicly funded resources, with the answers having ...
    • New: Municipal Corporate Law
      August 11, 2016
      Corporate law has long been a creature of the state legislatures, implemented largely by statutes and interpreted by courts. Only recently has the federal government entered the game via substantive governance requirements enacted in Sarbanes Oxley and Dodd-Frank. There is a significant complication to this conventional wisdom, however, which has been almost completely overlooked. Cities’ role as significant creators of corporate law is increasing, largely in the form of command-and-control mandates imposed on corporations active within a city’s limits. Cities have become involved in determining the internal composition of organizations, as city agencies have prescribed board diversity quotas in nonprofit grant conditions or diverse ownership in contract bidding requirements. Cities have also raised expectations for corporations’ community engagement through proposed community benefits ordinances and enacted percent-for-art laws that require corporations to be contributing community ...
    • New: Small Farm Survival Through Trust and Social Networks: A Case Study of Raciechowice, Poland
      August 11, 2016
      Small, subsistence-farming operations have patched the countryside and the cultural framework of Poland throughout its history. This tradition is threatened by globalization, especially Poland's recent entry into the European Union. EU rural restructuring programs seek to remedy the inefficiencies of Poland's "fragmented" agrarian structure so that Poland can participate in the EU's Common Agricultural Market; yet, increases in global competitiveness come at the cost of many environmental and economic effects, as well as a dislocation of the traditional social fabric in rural Poland. This study examines current and potential areas for farmer and local government (gmina) involvement in protection of farmland as an attempt to prevent such adverse outcomes while still increasing farm viability and profitability. Sixteen structured interviews with local government officials, current small farmers and ex-small farmers were conducted in Raciechowice, a traditional small farming community ...
  • Accomplishments
    • Anne Choike presented a poster at the 2018 Association of American Law Schools Annual Conference on Clinical Legal Education with Susan Brooks of Drexel University Thomas R. Kline School of Law. Their presentation was on “Transactional vs. Litigation-Oriented Clinics: Different Cloth or Common Threads?”
    • Anne Choike was a presenter at the annual Legal Issues in Social Entrepreneurship and Impact Investing – in the US and Beyond, a conference organized by the Impact Investing Legal Working Group and Grunin Center for Law and Social Entrepreneurship at New York University School of Law. She was a co-presenter for the panel “Reimagining Legal Education: From Mapping to Action.”
    • Anne Choike presented at Stanford Law School’s Legal Design Lab. She discussed “Community-Led System Design in Corporate Law: Three Short Stories from Detroit.”
    • Anne Choike presented at the International Legal Ethics Conference VIII: Legal Ethics in the Asian Century in Melbourne, Australia on Dec. 6. Choike’s panel was on “Business Transactions and Ethical Conflict at the Edge of the Glass Cliff: The Implications upon Client Counseling of Disparity in Attorney Discipline.”
    • Anne Choike participated in Stanford Law School’s Legal Design Lab summit “Prototyping For Policy” in November. The summit focused on how prototyping design methods — drawn from human-centered design, systems thinking, agile policy-making, and beyond — can be used to make better policy that better serves people.
    • Anne Choike was nominated for the Wayne State University Spirit of Community Award.
    • Anne Choike presented at the American Institute for Architects Christopher Kelly Leadership Development Program, hosted by the Detroit Center for Design + Technology.
    • Anne Choike was a panelist at the Kauffman Foundation’s annual Mayors Conference on Entrepreneurship on May 21 in Kansas City. She was part of a panel discussing opportunity zones.
    • Anne Choike participated in a panel titled “Tandem Structures Involving Nonprofits and For-Profits” at the University of Missouri-Kansas City’s Midwest Symposium on Social Entrepreneurship on May 13.
    • Anne Choikeis an editor of “Feminist Judgments: Corporate Law Opinions Rewritten” for The Feminist Judgments Series. The goal of the book is to re-envision corporate law as it is practiced and interpreted today, using feminist methods and feminist legal theory.

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