Wayne State University

Books

Immigration Relief: Legal Assistance for Noncitizen Crime Victims
Assistant Professor of Law; Director of the Asylum and Immigration Law Clinic Rachel Settlage
Immigration Relief: Legal Assistance for Noncitizen Crime Victims (American Bar Association) 2014 with Elizabeth Campbell and Veronica Thronson

A significant part of the challenge of assisting immigrant victims of crime is gaining a command of the myriad statutes, regulations and agency guidance that this area of the law comprises. This essential resource synthesizes, explains and guides the reader through all of the crucial components of this area of the law.

In addition to explaining the law, this book provides invaluable practice tools such as:

• Definitions of key terms and concepts
• Charts explaining the organization of the various agencies and departments involved in the adjudication of applications for immigration relief
• Helpful checklists to ensure that the final applications for relief are complete
• Lists of additional resources for attorneys
• And more

Whether you are a new or experienced attorney, a legal assistant, a social worker, a law enforcement officer, a prosecutor, a judge, or anyone else who interacts with immigrant victims of crime, this book is an invaluable resource. Its careful organization, thorough explanations and clear presentation demystify the daunting array of immigration statutes, cases, regulations, practice manuals and policy memoranda that govern the adjudication of applications for immigration relief for immigrant victims of crime. It is an essential tool for anyone who works with this most vulnerable population of noncitizens.

 

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The Prosecution and Defense of Public Corruption: The Law and Legal Strategies
Professor of Law Peter Henning
The Prosecution and Defense of Public Corruption: The Law and Legal Strategies (LexisNexis) 2014

This unique publication provides a thorough legal analysis of the disparate areas of the law that can be used to prosecute public officials at all levels of government. The authors discuss how counsel can develop appropriate legal strategies for prosecuting and defending these cases. Many essential topics are addressed with the practitioner in mind, including evidence gathering issues, privilege issues, issues at trial and sentencing issues.

 

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Constitutional Law in the United States
Distinguished Professor of Law Robert Sedler
Constitutional Law in the United States (Kluwer Law International) 2014 second edition

“Derived from the renowned multivolume International Encyclopaedia of Laws, this very useful analysis of constitutional law in the United States provides essential information on the country’s sources of constitutional law, its form of government, and its administrative structure,” according to the publisher. “Lawyers who handle transnational matters will appreciate the clarifications of particular terminology and its application.”

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Securities Crimes
Professor of Law Peter Henning
Securities Crimes (Thomson Reuters) 2013 2nd edition, with Marvin G. Pickholz and Jason R. Pickholz

Securities Crimes (2nd ed.) incorporates the latest developments in the enforcement of federal securities laws, including insider trading, accounting fraud, and violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. It provides a wide array of strategies, tactics, and techniques for defending securities criminal cases, including prosecutions involving related statutes, such as mail and wire fraud, RICO, and obstruction of justice. The treatise is the leading work designed for practitioners by providing in-depth coverage of the process of a criminal case and related civil enforcement actions.

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Crusader for Justice: Federal Judge Damon J. Keith
Director of the Damon J. Keith Center for Civil Rights; Professor of Law Peter Hammer
Crusader for Justice: Federal Judge Damon J. Keith (Wayne State University Press) 2013 Compiled, written, and edited by Peter J. Hammer and Trevor W. Coleman, Foreword by Mitch Albom

The Hon. Damon J. Keith was appointed to the federal bench in 1967 and has served as a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit since 1977, where he has been an eloquent defender of civil and constitutional rights and a vigorous enforcer of civil rights law. In Crusader for Justice: Federal Judge Damon J. Keith, authors Peter J. Hammer and Trevor W. Coleman presents the first ever biography of native Detroiter Judge Keith, surveying his education, important influences, major cases, and professional and personal commitments. Along the way, the authors consult a host of Keith's notable friends and colleagues, including former White House deputy counsel John Dean, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, and industrialist Edsel Ford II for this candid and comprehensive volume.
Hammer and Coleman trace Keith's early life, from his public school days in Detroit to his time serving in the segregated U.S. Army and his law school years at Howard University at the dawn of the Civil Rights era. They reveal how Keith's passion for racial and social justice informed his career, as he became co-chairman of Michigan's first Civil Rights Commission and negotiated the politics of his appointment to the federal judiciary. The authors go on to detail Keith's most famous cases, including the Pontiac Busing and Hamtramck Housing cases, the 1977 Detroit Police affirmative action case, the so-called Keith Case (United States v. U.S. District Court), and the Detroit Free Press v. Ashcroft case in 2002. They also trace Keith's personal commitment to mentoring young black lawyers, provides a candid look behind the scenes at the dynamics and politics of the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals, and even discuss some of Keith's difficult relationships, for instance with the Detroit NAACP and Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas.
Judge Keith's 45 years on the bench offer a unique viewpoint on a tumultuous era of American and legal history. Readers interested in Civil Rights-era law, politics, and personalities will appreciate the portrait of Keith's fortitude and conviction in Crusader for Justice.

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Chapters on financial services and gambling in  VAT in Africa.
Distinguished Professor of Law Alan Schenk
Chapters on financial services and gambling in VAT in Africa. (Pretoria University Tax Press) 2008 (edited by R. Krever)

A book specifically designed for the VAT systems in use on the African continent, these chapters cover industries that typically are hard to tax under a VAT. The chapter suggests ways in which African countries can expand their VAT bases by including some of the value added by these industries. Professor Schenk uses the book in a Value Added Course that he teaches for the African Tax Institute.


Modern Water Law: Private Property, Public Rights, and Environmental Protections
Associate Dean for Student Affairs Noah Hall
Modern Water Law: Private Property, Public Rights, and Environmental Protections (Foundation Press) 2013 with Robert W. Adler and Robin K. Craig

Modern Water Law: Private Property, Public Rights, and Environmental Protection provides a comprehensive text to study the range of legal issues and doctrines that affect water resources in the United States. The field of water law has evolved considerably in recent decades, expanding well beyond historic common-law doctrines of riparian reasonable use and prior appropriation. Modern Water Law thus offers a new conceptual approach to the field of water law as an integration of (1) private property (the common-law doctrines for riparian reasonable use and prior appropriation, as well as groundwater rights and the statutory schemes for administering water use rights), (2) public rights (navigation, the public trust doctrine, federal reserved rights, and interstate water management), and (3) environmental protections (the energy-water nexus, water pollution, and endangered species conflicts). The modern practice of water law requires attorneys to understand the interactions between different legal doctrines and regimes and how potential conflicts among them can be resolved in practice. Modern Water Law will prepare students and practitioners for the challenges of 21st century water law.

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White Collar Crime
Professor of Law Peter Henning
White Collar Crime (West Academic Publishing) 2013 third edition, with Jerold H. Israel, Nancy J. King and Ellen S. Podgor

Authored by leading academics who bring strong scholarly and practice perspectives to the subject, White Collar Crime is the first one-volume, in-depth analysis of substantive and procedural aspects of white collar crime. Offenses analyzed include conspiracy, fraud, corruption, RICO, false statements, perjury, tax, currency reporting, bankruptcy, environmental, and computer crimes.

Procedural issues are addressed in detail, including the grand jury process, agency investigations, parallel proceedings, self-incrimination (testimony and documents), searches, and privileges. In addition to statutes and caselaw, the book covers strategy and DOJ internal guidelines and also includes sentencing of both individuals and corporations in white-collar cases. This book is an indispensable guide for students and practitioners alike.

 

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Change and Continuity at the World Bank: Reforming Paradoxes of Economic Development
Director of the Damon J. Keith Center for Civil Rights; Professor of Law Peter Hammer
Change and Continuity at the World Bank: Reforming Paradoxes of Economic Development (Edward Elgar Publishing) 2013

This fascinating book examines the World Bank's capacity for change, illustrating the influence of overlapping political, organizational and epistemic constraints. Through comprehensive historical and economic analysis, Peter J. Hammer illuminates the difficulties faced by recent attempts at reform and demonstrates the ways in which the training and socialization of Bank economists work to define the policy space available for meaningful change.

The author examines the patterns of change and continuity at the World Bank during the presidencies of James Wolfensohn (1995-2005), Paul Wolfowitz (2005-2007) and Robert Zoellick (2007-2012) and discusses the role that various Chief Economists have played in the evolution of the Bank's research activities. His analysis of Bank reforms - both successful and unsuccessful - demonstrates how neoclassical economics sets the Bank's research and development agendas and limits reform possibilities derived from different academic traditions.

This clear and balanced account is an important case study in the role that epistemic constraints can play in the formation of public policy, with implications for both the World Bank and other international organizations. Students, professors and researchers with an interest in economic development, institutional economics and policy studies will find it an invaluable resource, as will government officials and practitioners working in international development.

 

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Criminal Law: Concepts and Practice
Professor of Law Peter Henning
Criminal Law: Concepts and Practice (Carolina Press) 2013 co-authored with Ellen S. Podger, Andrew Taslitz, and Alfredo Garcia

This book is a leader in providing materials that match the “skills and values” theme emphasized in the MacCrate and Carnegie Reports. The new third edition includes over 50 problems that allow the law professor to explore the practical impact of the theoretical concepts underlying criminal law. The new edition expands this orientation with several new problems, a new case study that examines issues from Jena Six, as well as new materials that recognize recent federal sentencing guideline changes. The book retains its international and comparative notes with the addition of a problem that considers the increased influence of international matters. In keeping with the original theme of having a casebook with recent decisions, several new cases are inserted, with a few older ones removed. The authors plan to introduce with this casebook a website that will offer podcasts, syllabi, Powerpoints, and other teaching materials. In short, a text that is compact, student-friendly, flexible, both practical and theoretical, and hi-tech ­ all in one novel package, including a teachers' manual with answers to every problem.


Criminal Pretrial Advocacy
Professor of Law Peter Henning
Criminal Pretrial Advocacy (West Law School) 2013 with Leonid Feller and Karen McDonald Henning

Criminal Pretrial Advocacy fills a critical gap in the skills training for law students by providing a complete course addressing the pretrial phase of a criminal prosecution along with plea negotiation and sentencing. It contains materials to follow a case through all the important steps in a criminal prosecution from the decision to file charges to challenges to the investigative tactics and evidence to plea bargaining. The casebook covers the pretrial process in a criminal case by incorporating both a discussion of the rules and procedures in each phase along with the basic legal doctrines related to criminal prosecutions. This gives students the substantive foundation to proceed through the course by providing a foundation for understanding how the process unfolds. It is designed to give students the opportunity to engage in both legal writing exercises and court appearances.

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Visualizing Secured Transactions, 2nd edition
Professor of Law Laura Bartell
Visualizing Secured Transactions, 2nd edition (LexisNexis) 2013

Visualizing Secured Transactions takes the basic areas covered by Article 9 and creates a visual aid for the statutory provisions typically assigned in connection with those areas. Some visual aids cover a single section while others summarize a number of sections bearing on a single topic. The overarching goal of Visualizing Secured Transactions is to help students see the organizational structure and create visual clues for remembering content. This unique book, updated to reflect changes in the law since the first edition was published in 2005, uses visual aids such as charts and diagrams to foster student understanding and application of the law governing secured transactions. The organization of the material tracks the outline and scope of traditional Secured Transactions casebooks and covers Article 9 of the UCC and related UCC provisions and sections of the Bankruptcy Code.

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Law and Language: Current Legal Issues 2013 (eds. Michael Freeman and Fiona Smith)
Walter S. Gibbs Professor of Constitutional Law Steven Winter
Law and Language: Current Legal Issues 2013 (eds. Michael Freeman and Fiona Smith) (Oxford University Press) 2013

Law and Language, the fifteenth volume in the Current Legal Issues series, is based upon an annual colloquium held at University College London. Each year leading scholars from around the world gather to discuss the relationship between law and another discipline of thought. Each colloquium examines how the external discipline is conceived in legal thought and argument, how the law is pictured in that discipline, and analyses points of controversy in the use, and abuse, of extra-legal arguments within legal theory and practice. This volume offers an insight into the scholarship examining the relationship between language and the law. The issues examined in this book range from problems of interpretation and beyond to the difficulties of legal translation, the role of language and the law in a variety of literary works; and considers the interrelation between language and the law in a variety of contexts, including criminal law, contract law, family law, human rights law, and EU law. Professor Winter's chapter - Frame Semantics and the ‘Internal Point of View' - examines the classic debate in jurisprudence between Hart's positivism and Dworkin's version of natural law in light of the recent developments in cognitive science.

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Corporate Taxation
Professor of Law Linda Beale
Corporate Taxation (LexisNexis) 2012

Corporate Taxation is part of the LexisNexis Graduate Tax Series, which is geared toward LLM degree programs in tax. The book's co-author is Charlotte Crane, Professor of Law, Northwestern University School of Law.

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View Table of Contents and Introductory Material Mastering Criminal Procedure, Volume 2 The Adjudicatory Stage
Professor of Law Peter Henning
View Table of Contents and Introductory Material Mastering Criminal Procedure, Volume 2 The Adjudicatory Stage (Carolina Academic Press) 2012

Mastering Criminal Procedure, Volume 2: The Adjudicatory Stage focuses on the process of a criminal case from the filing of charges against a defendant through the pre-trial and trial stages of the prosecution, and then post-conviction proceedings. This concise guide treats the leading Supreme Court decisions along with a range of statutes and rules that govern the process by which a criminal charge is adjudicated. A number of constitutional protections apply in a prosecution, including the right to a jury trial, confrontation of witnesses, the prohibition on excessive bail, and protection from double jeopardy. A number of procedural rules come into play, including discovery rights, jurisdiction and venue, and post-conviction proceedings, including habeas corpus.

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Visualizing Bankruptcy
Professor of Law Laura Bartell
Visualizing Bankruptcy (LexisNexis) 2011

This unique study guide uses visual aids such as charts and diagrams to foster student understanding and application of the law governing bankruptcy.They are organized not by chapter of the Bankruptcy Code (for the most part) but chronologically by the normal course of a bankruptcy case. Some visual aids cover a single provision or concept while others summarize several bearing on a single topic. The overarching goal is to help students see the organizational structure and create visual clues for remembering content.

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Sovereign Equality and Moral Disagreement
Professor of Law Brad Roth
Sovereign Equality and Moral Disagreement (Oxford University Press) 2011

According to Oxford University Press, "in Sovereign Equality and Moral Disagreement: Premises of a Pluralist International Legal Order, Professor Brad R. Roth provides readers with a working knowledge of the various applications of sovereign equality in international law, and defends the principle of sovereign equality as a morally sound response to disagreements in the international realm."

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Global Issues in Criminal Procedure
Professor of Law Peter Henning
Global Issues in Criminal Procedure (West Academic Publishing) 2011 with Linda Carter and Christopher Blakesley

Global Issues in Criminal Procedure provides an overview of constitutional issues that arise when searches, seizures and interrogations occur outside the United States. As crimes increasingly cross international borders, investigations also cross national boundaries. The materials in this book examine prosecutions in U.S. courts that involve evidence obtained abroad. There are two main parts to the book: 1) Searches and Seizures Abroad and 2) Interrogations Abroad. The first part examines the reach of the Fourth Amendment when the searches and seizures involve U.S. citizens abroad compared with non-U.S. citizens. Cases such as Verdugo-Urquidez and Alvarez-Machain are included, along with more recent cases that stem from recent terrorism prosecutions. Since the September 11 attacks, electronic surveillance has also become more important in conducting investigations and raises new challenges. A section on electronic surveillance contains materials on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act with its amendments from the USA Patriot Act and more recent amendments. The second part of the book looks at the reach of the Fifth Amendment and Due Process Clause abroad, both the ban on involuntary statements and the protections of Miranda. This section further includes materials on torture and extraordinary renditions. There is also a short discussion of indefinite detention in places like Guantnamo Bay, Cuba, Afghanistan, and in other sites. The book is designed to be used in conjunction with a basic Criminal Procedure textbook that covers the traditional Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendment cases. The materials provide an opportunity to extend the study of these Amendments into the international implications and issues that face many criminal law practitioners and judges in cases today in U.S. courts.

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Realizing the Right to Health
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Lance Gable
Realizing the Right to Health (Rueffer & Rub) 2009 Gable co-authored a chapter with Lawrence O. Gostin titled "Mental Health as a Human Right"

From Swisshumanrightsbook.com: "Realizing the right to health requires a strong focus on strengthening health care systems and transforming health systems for women. Taking a human rights approach to health means understanding the underlying social determinants of this right, as well as how to ensure the right to health is realized in times of emergency and armed conflict, and for all groups in society, including migrants and refugees, LGBTI persons, prisoners and detainees, and others. In this third volume of the Swiss Human Rights Book series, leading international experts in human rights and health address issues such as access to essential medicine, HIV/AIDS, trade and health, SARS and malaria, and human rights approaches to other key health challenges. They address the role of governments, non-state actors and healthcare practitioners, the responses of multilateral institutions, and highlight some of the most promising strategies for realizing the right to health."

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The VAT Reader: What a Federal Consumption Tax Would Mean for America
Distinguished Professor of Law Alan Schenk
The VAT Reader: What a Federal Consumption Tax Would Mean for America (Tax Analysts) 2011

Professor Schenk wrote a chapter in this book called "Prior U.S. Flirtations with VAT."

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The Prosecution and Defense of Public Corruption: The Law and Legal Strategies
Professor of Law Peter Henning
The Prosecution and Defense of Public Corruption: The Law and Legal Strategies (Oxford)

The Prosecution and Defense of Public Corruption: The Law and Legal Strategies is the only comprehensive analysis of public corruption prosecutions available today. It furnishes a detailed analysis of the federal statutes and leading cases related to the investigation and prosecution of public officials at the federal, state and local level, covering all facets of public conduct.

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Value Added Tax: A Comparative Approach
Distinguished Professor of Law Alan Schenk
Value Added Tax: A Comparative Approach (Cambridge University Press) co-author late Professor Oliver Oldman of Harvard Law School

Value Added Tax is an important revenue source in all major industrialized countries except the U.S. and is widely used in developing countries as well. This unique comparative value added tax book provides comprehensive teaching tools – laws, cases, analytical exercises, and questions drawn from the experience of countries and organizations from around the world. It also serves as a resource for tax practitioners and government officials. Professor Schenk incorporated in this text the expertise he developed while drafting value added taxes for developing countries in Africa and the Caribbean.


Environmental Law and Policy: Nature, Law, and Society
Associate Dean for Student Affairs Noah Hall
Environmental Law and Policy: Nature, Law, and Society (Aspen Publishers, Inc.)

Environmental Law and Policy: Nature, Law, and Society, Fourth Edition is a user-friendly book noted for its comprehensive legal process approach to the depth and complexity of modern environmental law, gives students a solid doctrinal footing in the law and helps build their analytical skills

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Intellectual Property Litigation: Pretrial Practice, Third Edition.
Professor of Law Katherine White
Intellectual Property Litigation: Pretrial Practice, Third Edition. (Aspen) 2008 co-authored w/Eric M. Dobrusin

This book offers up-to-date, comprehensive case analysis and a clear framework for streamlining the procedural requirements and issues involved in resolving patent disputes. The book provides an unparalleled analysis of crucial procedures and guiding case law on key phases of pretrial litigation practice including: preliminary injunction, bifurcation, discovery, summary judgment, and more. Readers will learn cutting-edge, evidence-based practices to establish facts, test the sufficiency of an opponent's case, commit an opponent to a position, and focus the issues toward their advantage. http://www.aspenpublishers.com/Product.asp?catalog_name=Aspen&category_name=&product_id=0735567832&cookie_test=1

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State Secretaries of State: Guardians of the Democratic Process
Dean Jocelyn Benson
State Secretaries of State: Guardians of the Democratic Process (Ashgate) 2010

Nearly a decade after the 2000 presidential elections invited a firestorm of questions about the sanctity of our democratic process, there continues to be a heightened interest in the role of state-wide elections officials, typically the state's Secretary of State. This book looks into their pivotal role in the promotion of a healthy democracy.

Much past interest has resulted in overly critical coverage of election errors, ignoring the tireless efforts that ensure the American citizens benefit from a democratic, inclusive and accountable election process. Through a series of case studies, anecdotes, and interviews with current and recent secretaries, State Secretaries of State author Jocelyn Benson readdresses this balance by providing the first in-depth study of the Secretary's role in registering voters, enforcing voting laws and regulations, overseeing elections, and certifying results. As such, it represents a much-needed contribution to the study of U.S. elections, both in practice and in law.

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Mastering Criminal Procedure, Volume 1
Professor of Law Peter Henning
Mastering Criminal Procedure, Volume 1 (Carolina Academic Press) 2010 coauthored with Professor Andrew Taslitz (Howard), Dean Margaret Paris (Oregon), Professor Cynthia Jones (American) and Professor Ellen Podgor (Stetson).

From Carolina Academic Press:

Mastering Criminal Procedure provides a concise treatment of the relevant federal constitutional doctrines that guide and constrain interactions between the police and individuals in the investigation of criminal conduct. The book provides an overview of the criminal process and the constitutional sources of the criminal procedure rules, including different approaches to constitutional interpretation.

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Law and the Humanities: An Introduction
Walter S. Gibbs Professor of Constitutional Law Steven Winter
Law and the Humanities: An Introduction (Cambridge University Press)

According to Cambridge.com, "Law and the Humanities: An Introduction brings together a distinguished group of scholars from law schools and an array of the disciplines in the humanities. Contributors come from the United States and abroad in recognition of the global reach of this field. This book is, at one and the same time, a stock taking both of different national traditions and of the various modes and subjects of law and humanities scholarship. It is also an effort to chart future directions for the field. By reviewing and analyzing existing scholarship and providing thematic content and distinctive arguments, it offers to its readers both a resource and a provocation. Thus, Law and the Humanities marks the maturation of this 'law and' enterprise and will spur its further development." This is the first book of its kind in the field. It is interdisciplinary. It is global.

Professor Winter's chapter: Law, Culture, and Humility

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Users' Handbook for Documentary Credits Under UCP 600.
Distinguished Professor of Law John Dolan
Users' Handbook for Documentary Credits Under UCP 600.

Commercial letters of credit remain a rather arcane subject. International bankers and many experienced commercial lawyers understand them and understand the Uniform Customs and Practice for Documentary Credits (UCP 600) that usually govern them; but many buyers, sellers, and lawyers, those new to international sales as well as many with experience in international sales, are sufficiently unfamiliar with the subject that they will benefit from a users’ handbook. The perceived need is for an introduction to international sales, international payments, and the commercial letter of credit. The Paris-based International Chamber of Commerce commissioned this users’ handbook to fill the need.


On Philosophy in American Law
Walter S. Gibbs Professor of Constitutional Law Steven Winter
On Philosophy in American Law (Cambridge University Press) 2009 Contributor

According to Cambridge University Press, this book gathers 38 leading scholars working in law and philosophy to provide focused and straightforward articulations of the role that philosophy might play at this juncture of American legal history. The volume marks the 75th anniversary of Karl Llewellyn's essay "On Philosophy in American Law," in which he rehearsed the broad development of American jurisprudence, diagnosed its contemporary failings, and then charted a productive path opened by the variegated scholarship that claimed to initiate a realistic approach to law and legal theory. The essays are written in the spirit of Llewellyn's article: they are succinct and direct arguments about the potential for bringing law and philosophy together.

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A Guide to the Judicial Management of Bankruptcy Mega-Cases, 2nd edition
Professor of Law Laura Bartell
A Guide to the Judicial Management of Bankruptcy Mega-Cases, 2nd edition (Federal Judicial Center) 2009 update of the 2007 version

Building on the 1992 first edition, this guide pools the knowledge of bankruptcy judges and clerks of court experienced in handling mega-cases in a written resources for others. It describes the general time line of a mega-case, issues that are likely to arise, and how other judges have approached those issues. The revised guide reflects management strategies currently set by statute, case law, local rules and general orders, and employed by individual judges. It expands coverage of topics that have gained prominence since the guide was first published.

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Living on the Margins: Minorities and Borderlines in Cambodia and Southeast Asia
Director of the Damon J. Keith Center for Civil Rights; Professor of Law Peter Hammer
Living on the Margins: Minorities and Borderlines in Cambodia and Southeast Asia (The Center for Khmer Studies) 2009 Edited by Peter Hammer

Cambodia is undergoing dramatic political, economic and social changes, placing new pressures on minority groups and vulnerable peoples. Some changes are driven by Cambodia's uniquely troubled history. Other forces are global, affecting Cambodia and all other nations in the region. This volume presents a collection of select edited papers presented at an International Conference in Siem Reap, Cambodia, sponsored by the Center for Khmer Studies with the support of the Rockefeller Foundation as part of their Capacity Building in Cambodian Higher Education Program. Important insights can be gained by looking at the lives of those living on the margins. An appreciation of margins, minorities and borderlines teaches a number of object lessons, but it also suggests an enlightening method of analysis. Margins identify fault lines, demarcating borders where powerful tectonic plates rub against each other, whether these plates represent conflicting social institutions or the forces of transcendent, but ill-defined processes like nation-building, economic development or globalization. Engaging the lives of real people caught on these margins can lead to new understandings of the often invisible forces shaping and reshaping Cambodia and the region. The problems of ethnic groups are one concern. Transnational and cross border influences are creating new challenges and opportunities for ethnic minorities. The Cham and other Muslim communities are reconnecting to international Islam. Labor markets cross national boundaries. Vietnamese migrant workers travel to Cambodia, as Cambodian workers travel to Thailand. International loans, agencies and programs targeting development, itself an often disruptive cross border force, are transforming many Cambodian institutions and redefining traditional social margins in the process. This clash of forces is most profoundly felt by the indigenous peoples of the northeast, but the papers also examine other minorities and vulnerable groups who have been systematically denied access to important social resources. Theories of social exclusion teach that the landless, street children, victims of domestic violence and gay and lesbian persons are on the margins of different Cambodian institutions and that borders are not only of a geographic nature.

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Consumer Protection Law Developments
Associate Vice President for Academic Personnel Stephen Calkins
Consumer Protection Law Developments (American Bar Association) 2009 co-editor

The focus of this book is a complete and detailed perspective on consumer protection laws, with emphasis on developments regarding federal, state, and international law, as well as industry self-regulation. You'll find information on administrative litigation, consumer class actions, Lanham Act and Sherman Act litigation, and express, implied, and establishment claims; qualitative and quantitative consumer perception analysis; industry standard, modified industry standards, and nonstandard product testing; statistical analysis and more.

In addition to advertising law, this book endeavors to identify all the applicable laws, touching on all of the relevant disciplines, including deception and unfairness, promotion and direct marketing, private remedies, privacy and data security, industry self-regulation, and international consumer protection.

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Research With High-Risk Populations: Balancing Science, Ethics, and Law
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Lance Gable
Research With High-Risk Populations: Balancing Science, Ethics, and Law (American Psychological Association) 2009 Edited by David Buchanan, DrPH; Celia B. Fisher, PhD; and Lance Gable, JD, MPH

Research With High-Risk Populations provides guidance to social scientists regarding their ethical and legal responsibilities to respond appropriately to threats of harm that may arise during the course of data collection. Contributing authors include leading researchers, ethicists, lawyers, and Institutional Review Board (IRB) members from across the country who illuminate the complexities of the issues using case studies from their own research projects. This collection of ethical and legal analyses examines both the challenges of conducting research designed to responsibly gain a better understanding of the origins of serious health problems, and the moral and legal obligations of researchers who learn of threats of violence in the course of pursuing the primary objectives of the research. This book maps out an appropriate balance between protecting human research participants from harm and generating new scientific knowledge. It will enable researchers and IRB members to become more knowledgeable about the different ways of allowing valuable research to go forward, while minimizing the potential for harm and protecting all parties involved from undue harm and exploitation.


The Cambridge Handbook of Metaphor and Thought
Walter S. Gibbs Professor of Constitutional Law Steven Winter
The Cambridge Handbook of Metaphor and Thought (Cambridge University Press)

According to Cambridge.com, a "comprehensive collection of essays in multidisciplinary metaphor scholarship that was written in response to the growing interest among scholars and students from a variety of disciplines such as Linguistics Philosophy, Anthropology, Music, as well as Psychology. These essays explore the significance of metaphor in language, thought, culture, and artistic expression. There are five main themes of the book: the roots of metaphor, metaphor understanding, metaphor in language and culture, metaphor in reasoning and feeling, and metaphor in non-verbal expression. Contributors come from a variety of academic disciplines, including psychology, linguistics, philosophy, cognitive science, literature, education, music, and law." Professor Winter's contribution explores the role of metaphor in legal thought, including its pivotal role in the maintenance of governmental accountability central to the ideal of "a government of laws and not of men."

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Humanitarian Occupation (Cambridge Studies in International and Comparative Law)
Director of the Program for International Legal Studies; Professor of Law Gregory Fox
Humanitarian Occupation (Cambridge Studies in International and Comparative Law) (Cambridge University Press) 2008

From Amazon.com: "This book analyzes a new phenomenon in international law: international organizations assuming the powers of a national government in order to reform political institutions. After reviewing the history of internationalized territories, this book asks two questions about these 'humanitarian occupations'. First, why did they occur? The book argues that the missions were part of a larger trend in international law to maintain existing states and their populations. The only way this could occur in these territories, which had all seen violent internal conflict, was for international administrators to take charge. Second, what is the legal justification for the missions? The book examines each of the existing justifications and finds them wanting. A new foundation is needed, one that takes account of the missions' authorisation by the UN Security Council and their pursuit of goals widely supported in the international community."

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Mastering Criminal Law
Professor of Law Peter Henning
Mastering Criminal Law (Carolina Press) 2008 co-authored w/Ellen S. Podger & Neil P. Cohen

This book provides a clear and concise consideration of the fundamental structure of a crime, including statutory interpretation and sentencing. It has chapters on the typical crimes covered in most criminal law casebooks, namely homicide, rape, assault and battery, and theft. It extends the study to newer forms of crimes, such as criminal enterprises, and includes chapters on accomplice liability, solicitation, attempt and conspiracy. The book covers the traditional defenses seen in criminal law courses and also examines the concept of what is a defense. Cultural defenses and the right to present a defense are included. Many factual examples come from real-world cases. The learning tools used throughout the book provide an overview of the subject, reinforcement of basic principles, and a better understanding of criminal law principles.


Antitrust Law: Policy and Practice, Fourth Edition
Associate Vice President for Academic Personnel Stephen Calkins
Antitrust Law: Policy and Practice, Fourth Edition (LexisNexis) 2008 co-authored with C. Paul Rogers III, Mark R. Patterson and William R. Andersen

From LexisNexis.com: "This book explores in detail those legal issues that arise in counseling, planning, and litigating under the antitrust laws. It is designed to integrate theory and policy issues with doctrine and practice so that students will emerge with a fundamental grasp of antitrust doctrine, at least an introduction to the vagaries of antitrust practice, and a sensitivity to policy issues undergirding the application and enforcement of the antitrust laws. The Fourth Edition of Antitrust Law: Policy and Practice provides close coverage of the application of antitrust doctrine to cutting-edge technologies, the Internet, and to rapidly shifting markets."

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Visualizing Secured Transactions
Professor of Law Laura Bartell
Visualizing Secured Transactions 2007

Law students, perhaps more than the population at large, tend to be visual learners. Visualizing Secured Transactions takes the text of Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code (and related statutes) and puts them into the form of easily-understandable charts to facilitate comprehension of this technical commercial subject.


Co-ed Combat: The New Evidence that Women Shouldn't Fight the Nation's Wars
Professor of Law Kingsley Browne
Co-ed Combat: The New Evidence that Women Shouldn't Fight the Nation's Wars (Sentinel (Penguin USA)) November 2007

American military women are increasingly exposed to combat risks, and opposition to Pentagon policy barring women from ground-combat specialties is becoming louder. Co-ed Combat examines assumptions underlying arguments for sexual integration of combat units in light of physical and psychological differences between the sexes. Differences in the functioning of all-male and mixed-sex groups – coupled with these physical and psychological sex differences – suggest that inclusion of women in combat units will lead to a weaker military.


Legal Aspects of HIV/AIDS: A Guide for Policy and Law Reform
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Lance Gable
Legal Aspects of HIV/AIDS: A Guide for Policy and Law Reform (The World Bank Group) 2007 with co-authors Katrina Gamharter, Lawrence O. Gostin, James G. Hodge Jr., and Rudolf V. van Puymbroeck

This book summarizes key legal and policy issues for 65 wide-ranging topics related to HIV/AIDS. The book shows how laws and regulations can either underpin or undermine good public health programs and responsible personal behaviors. It provides relevant “practice examples” (citing from actual laws and regulations) and offers selective lists of references. Laws relating to many areas of our lives--from intimate personal conduct to international travel--can contribute to stigma, discrimination, and exclusion, or can help remedy these inequities. In order to create a supportive legal framework for responding to HIV/AIDS, it is important that governments effectively address gaps and other problematic aspect in their legislation and regulatory systems.


The Law of Letters of Credit: Commercial and Standby Credits
Distinguished Professor of Law John Dolan
The Law of Letters of Credit: Commercial and Standby Credits (A.S. Pratt & Sons,) 2007 4th edition

The standby letter of credit is a commercial bank product critical to the financing of domestic commerce. The commercial letter of credit plays a critical role in trans-Pacific and North-South trade. The 4th edition of the often cited treatise, The Law of Letters of Credit, explains letters of credit and addresses comprehensively and with massive citation of authority all of the issues that have arisen in the marketplace, the banking house, and the courtroom.


Global Issues in Criminal Law
Professor of Law Peter Henning
Global Issues in Criminal Law (West Group) 2007 co-authored w/Linda Carter and Christorpher L. Blakesley

This book provides an introduction to issues arising in international and transnational crimes, giving students a broader perspective on a developing area of the law. The book also provides faculty and students with material from domestic and international sources. It builds on a number of subjects treated in the traditional criminal law class, such as mens rea, actus reus, accomplice and conspiratorial liability, and defenses, by analyzing three subjects of current interest: transnational crimes, terrorism, and genocide.


Evaluating Scientific Evidence: An Interdisciplinary Framework for Intellectual Due Process
Professor of Law Erica Beecher-Monas
Evaluating Scientific Evidence: An Interdisciplinary Framework for Intellectual Due Process (Cambridge University Press, 1st edition) November 30, 2006 Paperback: 272 pages, ISBN: 052167655X

Scientific evidence is crucial in a burgeoning number of litigated cases, legislative enactments, regulatory decisions, and scholarly arguments. Yet the mechanisms for evaluating scientific evidence are often less than ideal. Evaluating Scientific Evidence explores the question of what counts as scientific knowledge, a question that has become a focus of heated courtroom and scholarly debate, not only in the United States, but in other common law countries such as the United Kingdom, Canada and Australia.


Internet Commerce: The Emerging Legal Framework
Associate Professor of Law John Rothchild
Internet Commerce: The Emerging Legal Framework (Foundation Press, 2d ed.) 2006 with co-authors Radin, Reese, and Silverman

This casebook offers a grounding in the legal issues that arise in connection with doing business using the Internet. Topics covered include online contracts, government regulation, privacy, trademarks, copyright, consumer protection, spam and other electronic intrusions, liability of Internet service providers, electronic payment systems, and taxation of online commerce.


Constitutional Law - United States
Distinguished Professor of Law Robert Sedler
Constitutional Law - United States (Kluwer Law International) 2005

This book is a part of the Constitutional Law Series of the International Encyclopedia of Laws. It was first published in 1994. The book seeks to explain the nature and operation of the American constitutional system to an international audience. The book contains the following chapters: The Constitution as the Only Source of Constitutional Law. Constitutional Interpretation: The Role of the Supreme Court. Constitutional Supremacy. Form of Government. The Legislative Power. The Executive Power. Separation of Powers and Conflicts Between Congress and the President. The Judiciary. Independent Non-Political Agencies. The American Federal System. State and Municipal Government. The Interaction Between Federal and State Power. The States and "National Unity." Citizenship and the Relevance of Citizenship. Fundamental Rights and Liberties. Constitutional Problems of Minorities. Judicial Control of Administrative Action. Legal Position of Aliens. War, Treaty and Foreign Affairs Powers. Taxing and Spending Powers. Emergency Laws. The Relationship Between Church and State.


Across State Lines.
Distinguished Professor of Law Robert Sedler
Across State Lines. (American Bar Association, Section of General Practice) 1989

In our highly mobile and global society, the conflict of laws has been transformed from a fairly esoteric doctrine to a fact of everyday legal practice. In this book, the author explains how the conflict of laws is applied in a variety of situations with which lawyers must deal. It summarizes the different approaches that are followed by the courts in conflicts cases and the likely outcomes in the various fact-law patterns that present themselves in actual cases.


Law and Legal System of the Russian Federation
Professor of Law William Burnham
Law and Legal System of the Russian Federation (Juris Publishing, Inc., 3rd Edition) October 2004 co-authored with Peter B. Maggs and Gennady M. Danilenko

This book is a detailed treatment of the substantive and procedural law, the legal profession and court systems of Russia written especially for English-speaking lawyers and law students. It has the basic characteristics of a casebook in that it sets out key decisions of the Russian Constitutional Court, Supreme Court and Supreme Arbitrazh (Commercial) Court, followed by notes and questions. But it also contains substantial analytical and explanatory text and other materials, thus making it ideal for use as a reference book..


Derecho y Economia de la Competencia
Associate Vice President for Academic Personnel Stephen Calkins
Derecho y Economia de la Competencia (Thomson-West, 5th edition) August 2004, translated into Spanish 2008 co-authored with Ernest Gellhorn and William E. Kovacic

As a contribution to Mexican competition law, Professor Calkins's co-authored Antitrust Nutshell has been translated into Spanish by the Mexican Competition Commission, USAID, and the U.S. Embassy in Mexico.


Antitrust Law and Economics in a Nutshell
Associate Vice President for Academic Personnel Stephen Calkins
Antitrust Law and Economics in a Nutshell (Thomson-West, 5th edition) August 2004 co-authored with Ernest Gellhorn and William E. Kovacic

This 600-page book provides a thorough introduction to all of antitrust law and economics. It looks both backward to history and forward to future developments, reviewing all of the major cases and issues. It provides context, doctrine, and analysis. The authors include a former and the current General Counsel to the Federal Trade Commission.


Core Concepts of Commercial Law: Past, Present and Future, Cases and Materials
Distinguished Professor of Law John Dolan
Core Concepts of Commercial Law: Past, Present and Future, Cases and Materials (Thomson-West) April 2004 co-authored with Professors Bruce A. Markell and Lawrence Ponoroff

This book introduces students to commercial law and provides a modicum of Uniform Commercial Code learning. Much of the text emphasizes principles rather than the rules of commercial law. This emphasis is appropriate because the principles endure, whereas the rules change from state to state and time to time. The book, nevertheless, is full of rules, with lots of practical applications.


Uncertain Times: Kenneth Arrow and the Changing Economics of Health Care
Director of the Damon J. Keith Center for Civil Rights; Professor of Law Peter Hammer
Uncertain Times: Kenneth Arrow and the Changing Economics of Health Care (Duke University Press) December 2003 co-edited with Deborah Haas-Wilson, Mark A. Peterson, and William M. Sage

This collection revisits Nobel Prize-Winning economist Kenneth Arrow's classic 1963 essay "Uncertainty and the Welfare Economics of Medical Care" in light of the many changes in American health care since its publication. Coming from diverse backgrounds — economics, law, political science and the health care industry -- the contributors use Arrow's article to address an array of present-day health policy questions, ranging from insurance and technological innovation, to the role of charity, self-regulation and non-profit status.


A Clearing in the Forest
Walter S. Gibbs Professor of Constitutional Law Steven Winter
A Clearing in the Forest (University of Chicago Press) July 2001
This book presents the first systematic assessment of cognitive science’s implications for law. Recent findings about categorization and reasoning reveal the remarkably orderly, yet creative processes of human imagination. Cognitive science provides the tools to understand how real-world legal actors reason, opening a window on the imaginative, yet orderly mental processes that animate thinking and decision making among lawyers, judges, and lay persons.
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White Collar Crime: Law and Practice
Professor of Law Peter Henning
White Collar Crime: Law and Practice (West Group, 2d Edition (American Casebook Series)) July 2003 co-authored with Jerold H. Israel, Ellen S. Podgor, and Paul D. Borman

This book exposes students to how legal transactions involved in a single white collar crime case can require consideration of substantive criminal law, criminal procedure, administrative procedure, corporate law, evidence, civil procedure, sentencing law, and highly specialized regulatory law. It provides a unique combination of traditional materials (cases and statutes) and not-so-traditional materials (e.g., newspaper articles, forms, and practice manuals). Coverage includes traditional mail fraud, RICO (Racketeer Influenced Corrupt Organizations), and computer fraud legislation.


Secured Transactions and Payment Systems: Problems and Answers
Distinguished Professor of Law John Dolan
Secured Transactions and Payment Systems: Problems and Answers (Aspen Publishers, 2d Edition) February 2003 co-authored with Professors Leo L. Clarke, Larry Garvin, Allen R. Kamp, Kerry Macintosh

This student text provides a completely up-to-date treatment of the Uniform Commercial Code, including the recent revisions in Article 9. The material is presented in a problem and answer format. The first edition of this book was based on problems that Professor Dolan had been using with his students for a number of years. Last year, the publisher asked him to update the work, and Professor Dolan invited four commercial law teachers across the country to join him in the effort.


Biology at Work: Rethinking Sexual Equality
Professor of Law Kingsley Browne
Biology at Work: Rethinking Sexual Equality (Rutgers University Press) June 2002 The Rutgers Series in Human Evolution

Does biology help explain why women, on average, earn less money than men? Is there any evolutionary basis for the scarcity of female CEOs in Fortune 500 companies? According to Kingsley Browne, the answer may be yes. Biology at Work brings an evolutionary perspective to bear on issues of women in the workplace: the "glass ceiling," the "gender gap" in pay, sexual harassment, and occupational segregation. Winner of WSU Board of Governors Faculty Recognition Award for 2002/03.


Digital Copyright: Protecting Intellectual Property on the Internet
Professor Jessica Litman
Digital Copyright: Protecting Intellectual Property on the Internet (Prometheus Books) January 2001

In 1998, copyright lobbyists succeeded in persuading Congress to enact laws greatly expanding copyright owners' control over the private uses of their works. The efforts to enforce these rights have resulted in highly publicized legal battled between established media and upstart Internet companies such as Napster. In this book, Prof. Litman questions whether copyright laws crafted by lawyers and their lobbyists really make sense for the rest of us. Winner of WSU Board of Governors Faculty Recognition Award for 2002/03.


Democratic Governance and International Law
Director of the Program for International Legal Studies; Professor of Law Gregory Fox
Democratic Governance and International Law (Cambridge University Press ) 2000 Editor

From Amazon.com: "This book considers how the post-Cold War democratic revolution has affected international law. Traditionally, international law said little about the way in which governments were chosen. In the 1990s, however, international law has been deployed to encourage transitions to democracy, and to justify the armed expulsion of military juntas that overthrow elected regimes. In this volume, leading international legal scholars assess this change in international law and ask whether a commitment to democracy is consistent with the structure and rules of the international legal system."

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Democratic Governance and International Law
Professor of Law Brad Roth
Democratic Governance and International Law (Cambridge University Press) 2000 Editor

From Amazon.com: "This book considers how the post-Cold War democratic revolution has affected international law. Traditionally, international law said little about the way in which governments were chosen. In the 1990s, however, international law has been deployed to encourage transitions to democracy, and to justify the armed expulsion of military juntas that overthrow elected regimes. In this volume, leading international legal scholars assess this change in international law and ask whether a commitment to democracy is consistent with the structure and rules of the international legal system."

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Governmental Illegitimacy in International Law
Professor of Law Brad Roth
Governmental Illegitimacy in International Law (Oxford University Press) 1999

According to Amazon.com: "This work seeks to specify the international law of collective non-recognition of governments, so as to enable legal evaluation of cases in which competing factions assert governmental authority. It subjects the recognition controversies of the United Nations era to a systematic examination, informed by theoretical and comparative perspectives on governmental legitimacy."

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International Law Decisions in National Courts
Director of the Program for International Legal Studies; Professor of Law Gregory Fox
International Law Decisions in National Courts (Transnational Publications) 1996 with Thomas M. Franck

In this ground-breaking study, taken on the initiative of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, Thomas M Franck and Gregory H Fox explore the use of international law decisions by national courts. They provide in-depth materials for answers to such critical and practical questions as: To what extent do national judges treat the decision of their international colleagues as binding or persuasive? Do national judges regard the outcomes of international decisions as res judicata? As evidence of law or fact? Their analysis and conclusions constitute a valuable assessment of the role of international law in the legal cultures of today's nations.

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The Law Clerk Handbook
Professor of Law Laura Bartell
The Law Clerk Handbook (Federal Judicial Center) 1989 revised edition with Alvin B. Rubin

This handbook provides an overview of chambers operations and the work of the federal courts; it does not provide detailed procedures on every aspect of a law clerk's daily tasks or review the procedures of each individual court (this is in large part because the duties of law clerks vary from judge to judge).

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