Wayne State University

Aim Higher

News and Announcements Archive

Wayne Law to Host Japanese Judicial System Presentation, Nov. 16

November 13, 2007

International Education Week DETROIT (Nov. 13, 2007) – Wayne State University Law School and the Office of International Programs will proudly host a presentation on the Japanese Judicial System featuring Japanese Judge Kensuke Abo from 3 – 4:30 p.m. in the Hilberry Auditorium located in the Student Center on Friday, Nov. 16, 2007.

A scholar-in-residence with Wayne State University Law School for the 2007-2008 academic year by way of the recently announced Japanese Judge Program, Judge Abo will review the present circumstances, issues and reforms in the Japanese judicial system.

“Judge Abo’s experience and perspective gained from working in the Japanese judicial system will prove a wonderful learning experience for all in attendance,” said Wayne Law Dean Frank H. Wu. “We are pleased to have this opportunity to hear from Judge Abo and look forward to continued collaboration with the Supreme Court of Japan and the Third Circuit Court of Michigan with regard to Wayne Law’s Japanese Judge Program.”

Judge Abo earned his bachelor’s degree from the Faculty of Law of the University of Keio in Japan in 2003 and was appointed a judge in 2004. After receiving his degree, he completed a special course of practical legal training at the Legal Training and Research Institute of the Supreme Court as a legal apprentice.

He spent the first few years of his career hearing civil cases, and has been hearing criminal trials at Chiba District Court since April 2007. Judge Abo was selected by the Supreme Court of Japan to be the scholar in residence at Wayne Law and at the Third Circuit Court of Michigan. As such, he is studying the Circuit Court’s Civil Division and the Domestic Relations Section of the Family Division; observing the Court’s Jury Services and Case Processing Departments and the operations of the Mediation Tribunal Association; and studying the Court’s Criminal Division. He is also available to Wayne Law students and faculty to discuss research.

Wayne State University Law School has served Michigan and beyond since its inception as Detroit City Law School in 1927. Located in Detroit’s re-energized historic cultural center, the Law School remains committed to student success and features modern lecture and court facilities, multi-media classrooms, a 250-seat auditorium, and the Arthur Neef Law Library, which houses one of the nation's 30 largest legal collections. Taught by an internationally recognized faculty, Wayne State Law School students experience a high-quality legal education via a growing array of hands-on curricular offerings, five live-client clinics, and access to well over 100 internships with local and non-profit entities each year. Its 11,000 living alumni, who work in every state of the nation and more than a dozen foreign countries, include leading members of the local, national and international legal communities. For more information, visit www.law.wayne.edu.