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Wayne Law remembers Frederica K. Lombard

Detroit Free Press -- Frederica Lombard: Law professor was a trailblazer

Detroit News -- Professor aided women

Grosse Pointe News obituary
 

South End story
 

Frederica K. Lombard, former Wayne Law interim and associate dean, author, scholar and wife of Wayne County Judge Arthur Lombard, passed away June 16, 2011. 

She taught Civil Procedure, Family Law and more while at Wayne Law, and was one of the Law School's most committed and proud advocates. She was very beloved by the Wayne Law community.

Frederica was the proud mother of two and a recent grandmother.

A private family service will be held in her memory. Judge Lombard has requested no flowers, and asks instead that any memorials be made, in Frederica's honor to:

Lombard Fellow Support Fund
c/o Michael Silverstein
Wayne Law
471 West Palmer
Detroit, MI  48202
(313) 577-9238
silverstein@wayne.edu

 

The Wayne Law community remembers Frederica K. Lombard

"More than 30 years her colleague, rarely saw her without a smile; never heard her utter a cross word. She faced adversity with quiet courage." - Wayne Law Professor John Dolan

"I remember her as a fine teacher and scholar. She was always very practical and kind to us 'lowly' students with kind words of wisdom and advice." - Marshall H. Waldman, '69

"One of the few direct quotes that I can attribute to anyone, and one that I have thought of many times, is Professor Lombard's statement as she was teaching civil procedure: 'Litigation is not for the sleepy.'" - Patrick Rooney, '94

"Very sorry to hear of Freddie Lombard's passing. I enjoyed her class way back when, and I know she will be dearly missed by her family." - Paula Hunko Talarico

"I had Professor Lombard for Civ Pro my first semester of law school in 1996. She was the first professor to confront a group of young and timid students, fearing all that one hears about your first year. She was just a joy. She was funny, engaging and clearly an old pro. Future students are really going to miss out on a great professor. My prayers go to her and her family." - Tamara A. French, '99

"Both Frederica and her husband, Arthur Lombard, were caring and excellent educators and raised the level of Wayne Law to a higher standard - from a local law school to one that taught law as a human and enlightened endeavor. My condolences to Judge Lombard." - Jerome Tauber, '72

"I am saddened to tears. More than 35 years ago, Freddie introduced us to the law, teaching us Torts, Palsgraf, and all that went with it. She was not just a teacher, but a wonderfully informal and approachable companion who graciously suffered our sometime antics. We enjoyed the year. She taught us more than law. And, we are richer for knowing her." - Patrick Szymanski, ‘76

"Freddie Lombard was a role model and mentor to me when I was a law student many years ago. I was a working mother with two young children during Law School and Freddie was always supportive and helpful. If my childcare fell through, I could always bring my kids to Freddie's classes with no problem. In fact she delighted in having them there and made me and them feel comfortable. She was a wonderful professor and a great contributor to legal education. She will be missed." - Carol Clark, '81

"My favorite memory is of a law student talent show, where Arthur and Freddie were depicted explaining the facts of life to their children based on analogies to civil procedure. The whole Lombard family was in the audience and they laughed harder than anyone." - Heather Braithwaite Simmons, '85

"In the summer of 1972, a pregnant Frederica Lombard masterfully taught me Criminal Law as her infant son sat in the front row swinging legs that didn't touch the floor. Both Professors Lombard were superb in the classroom. In my 33 years as a faculty member in Wayne's Business School, I saw in Professor Frederica Lombard the personification of the highest ideals of an academic and an attorney. There was an understated greatness about her." - Bill Volz '75

"May her memory be for a blessing. I was very fortunate to have her her first year at Wayne." - David Wolock, '70

"As a Wayne Law grad of 1970, I encountered both of the Lombards [prior to their marriage], and so developed some of the 'bonding' that students often do with teachers who they like. I am so sorry to hear of her death, and I want to extend my best wishes and deepest condolences to both Judge Lombard and the family. I hope that you are granted the strength to bear up under the grieving process." - Ronald A. Steinberg, '70

"Professor Frederica Lombard had a profound impact on my life and my practice. She was an engaging, kind and concerned educator, who brought out the best in the students she taught. Having learned family law from her back in 1979, I went on to make family law the sole focus of my career. She also balanced her professional life with a wonderful sense of family. I always admired the relationship she and her husband, Arthur, had. You could tell from talking to either of them, how important family was. While I know that this must be a tragic loss to her loving husband and children, she has left a legacy that will always be cherished and admired." - Carlo J. Martina, '79

"I have good memories of Professor Lombard’s Civil Procedure class in my first year, but I will always remember her best for the assistance she gave to me a few years later. I developed some serious health issues that affected my vision just before exams. I went to then Associate Dean Lombard to explain that I fully intended to take a particular exam, but that the exam proctor should not be alarmed if I put my head down or used a cold compress to rest my eyes during the exam. Dean Lombard without hesitation offered to let me take the exam in an empty faculty office. On exam day, the empty office turned out to be then-President Adamany’s office, which he was not using that semester. The memory of her warmth and kindness will always be a standard for all lawyers who knew her to follow." - Patricia Paruch, '92

"I was sorry to learn of Freddie's death. She was a special person! I knew her a bit in her role as an advocate for children in her family law practitioner/teacher role when I chaired the Pediatrics Department at the School of Medicine. However, I got to know her much better in her capacity as associate dean when I was provost during the late 80's. She was always a straight shooter and a fair minded administrator.  Freddie always filled me in on her children's progress in medical school. She derived great pleasure from their successes. She was also devoted to Arthur and was proud of him both when he was dean at DCL and during his years as a judge. I will remember her very fondly." - Sanford (Sandy) N. Cohen, M.D., Professor Emeritus and Former Chair of Pediatrics, Former Sr. Associate Dean, School of Medicine, Former Provost and Sr. Vice President for Academic Affairs

"I remember her as a fine teacher and scholar. She was always very practical and kind to us 'lowly' students with kind words of wisdom and advice." - Marshall H. Waldman, '69


 

Frederica Lombard: Law professor was a trailblazer
Joe Rossiter/Detroit Free Press

During a 40-plus-year career with the Wayne State University Law School, Frederica Lombard served as a role model, mentor and trailblazer for countless women in the legal profession.

In addition to becoming the first full-time female law faculty member at the university, she was a former associate and interim dean.

Mrs. Lombard died Friday of congestive heart failure at St. John Hospital in Detroit. The Grosse Pointe Farms resident was 72.

"She taught with passion and inspired both men and women to think harder about law, and at the same time was a wonderful wife and mother," said her husband, Arthur Lombard, a Wayne County Circuit judge.

"We shared the perfect marriage for 42 years, carrying on wonderful and animated conversations throughout our lives and never running out of things to say to each other."

Frederica Koller was born in Reading, Pa., on April 22, 1939. She graduated from Bryn Mawr College with a degree in political science in 1961 and received her law degree three years later from the University of Pennsylvania. She also obtained a master's degree from Yale University Law School.

Mrs. Lombard began teaching in 1966 at Wayne State, where she met her future husband, who joined the law school faculty the same year. They married two years later.

She became a full professor in 1969, and was named associate dean in 1992, a position she held for 13 years. She served as interim dean for one year.

In one of several tributes posted on the Wayne State University Law School Web site, former student Carol Clark wrote about the continuous support and encouragement Mrs. Lombard gave her: "I was a working mother with two young children during law school. If my child care fell through, I could always bring my kids to Freddie's classes with no problem. In fact, she delighted in having them there and made me and them feel comfortable. She was a wonderful professor and a great contributor to legal education."

An expert in family law, Mrs. Lombard served on several faculty committees at WSU, including the Minority Employment Action Steering Committee and the Commission on the Status of Women, which strove to correct gender inequalities at the university. On the national scene, she sought to establish accreditation standards which prohibit law schools from discriminating against women.

She retired in 2007.

In addition to her husband, survivors include a daughter, Dr. Lisa Lombard; a son, Dr. David Lombard, and a grandson.

No funeral services are planned.

Her body has been cremated.

Contact Joe Rossiter: 313-222-6594 or jrossiter@freepress.com



Grosse Pointe News obituary

Died: Friday, June 17, 2011
Age: 72

Longtime Grosse Pointe resident Frederica Koller Lombard, 72, died Friday, June 17, 2011, of congestive heart failure at St. John Hospital and Medical Center in Detroit.

She was the first woman to serve as a professor of law at Wayne State University Law School and was a longtime dean during her 41 years at the school.

Born April 22, 1939, in Reading, Pa., she deflected her parents desire that she train to become a secretary and instead because the first member of her family to attend college. She graduated from Bryn Mawr College in 1961 and from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 1964 where she was an editor of the Law Review. Following a clerkship for the chief judge of the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas, she earned a Master of Laws degree from Yale Law School.

Mrs. Lombard began teaching at Wayne State University Law School in 1966, one of only a handful of female law professors in the nation. She met her husband, Arthur Lombard, who joined the law school faculty the same year. They married in 1968 and for several decades were the longest married couple in American law teaching.

In the 1970s, Mrs. Lombard was a founding member of Wayne State's Commission on the Status of Women which made strides correcting gender inequalities on campus. On the national level, she worked closely with another young law professor, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, now a U.S. Supreme Court Justice, to establish accreditation standards which prohibit law schools and firms interviewing on campus from discriminating against women. She played a significant role in litigation which ordered the nation's major university retirement plan, TIAA-CREF, to abandon its practice of paying female retirees lower monthly benefits than men because women generally live longer.

In 1992, Mrs. Lombard was appointed association dean of the Wayne State Law School. She held the position for an unprecedented 13 years. In 2003-2004 she served as interim Dean of the Law School. She had a major role in the expansion of the law school building in the early 2000s. Upon her retirement, at the urging of the student body, a major scholarship program was renamed the Lombard Scholarship Fund.

For the past 30 years, she and her husband were enthusiastic volunteers at the Manchester Music Festival, a chamber music festival near their vacation home in Vermont. At the time of her death, she was secretary of the festival's board of directors.

In December 2005, Mrs. Lombard underwent the first reported bone marrow transplant for a rare and fatal form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute at Harvard. The transplant was successful and she will be forever known there as "Patient One."

Mrs. Lombard is survived by her husband of 42 years, Wayne County Circuit Judge Arthur Lombard; daughter, Lisa Lombard; son, David Lombard and his wife, Ramona Uritescu-Lombard and grandson, Alexander Lombard.

A private funeral was held.

 

 

Professor aided women
Mark Hicks/ The Detroit News

As a longtime Wayne State University Law School professor and associate dean, Frederica Lombard loved showing how the law could help people.

"She was one of the most ethical people I have ever met," said Joan Mahoney, a former dean. "She was very hardworking."

Mrs. Lombard died Friday, June 17, 2011, from congestive heart failure. She was 72.

Born April 22, 1939, in Reading, Pa., Frederica Koller was the first in her family to earn a college degree when she graduated from Bryn Mawr in 1961.

She earned a law degree from the University of Pennsylvania, where she edited its Law Review.

After a clerkship in Philadelphia, she earned a master's degree from Yale Law School.

In 1966 she began working at Wayne State, where she met Arthur Lombard, who joined the faculty. They wed in 1968.

Teaching civil procedure, family law and other subjects, Mrs. Lombard sometimes illustrated points by using hypothetical situations involving birds and dogs.

"She took a lot of delight in that … wanting to give some lightness while staying true to the law issue that was being discussed," said Coco Siewert, a former executive assistant at the law school.

In 1970, Mrs. Lombard and her husband were admitted to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court on a case involving a Wayne State student.

She also was a founding member of Wayne State's Commission on the Status of Women, which examined gender inequalities; worked with former Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg to establish accreditation standards prohibiting gender discrimination at law schools; and played a role in litigation ordering a financial services group to stop paying female retirees lower benefits, associates said.

"She really used her law degrees to better the lives of other women," Siewert said.

Mrs. Lombard was appointed associate dean in 1992 and interim dean from 2003-04.

In those roles, "she solved problems with the kind of evenness that she exemplified throughout her life," said Arthur Lombard, a Wayne County Circuit Court judge.

After she retired in 2007, a departmental scholarship at the school was named in her honor.

Outside of work, Mrs. Lombard volunteered at the Manchester Music Festival in Vermont for nearly 30 years, helped at the WSU Alumni office and read to blind students.

Other survivors include two children, Dr. Lisa Lombard and Dr. David Lombard; a daughter-in-law, Ramona Uritescu-Lombard; and one grandchild.

Services are private.

Memorials may be made to the Lombard Fellow Support Fund, c/o Michael Silverstein, Wayne Law, 471 West Palmer, Detroit, MI 48202.

mhicks@detnews.com

(313) 222-2117

From The Detroit News: http://detnews.com/article/20110623/OBITUARIES/106230387/Professor-aided-women#ixzz1Q85qht00

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